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Google starts translation, software service to boost ad sales to exporters


Google Inc. started a service aimed at businesses that sell their products internationally, as the owner of the world’s most popular search engine seeks to boost advertising sales linked to online commerce.
The Google Ads for Global Advertisers site will offer functions including translation and software that help companies find customers in international markets, Google said today in an e-mailed statement.
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Report lists interpreter and translator careers as best careers of 2011 in U.S.


As one of the 50 Best Careers of 2011, this should have strong growth over the next decade
Interpreters and translators held more than 50,900 jobs in 2008—although the actual number is likely much higher because many people in this field work sporadically. Urban areas, especially Washington, D.C., New York, and cities in California, provide the most employment possibilities, especially for interpreters. Interpreters and translators of Spanish should have solid opportunities because of expected increases in the Hispanic population in the United States, and demand is also expected to be strong for interpreters and translators specializing in healthcare and law. Interpreters for the deaf should continue to have favorable employment prospects because of low supply, while conference interpreters and literary translators can expect competition because of the small number of jobs in these specialties.
Other languages in demand include Asian languages—Chinese, Korean, and Japanese—as well as Arabic, Farsi, and indigenous African languages. So, too, are European languages like French, Italian, and German. Read more.
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First Turkish-Romany dictionary to be completed soon


A historian in the Aegean Turkish province of İzmir has almost completed preparing the first Turkish-Romany dictionary, Doğan news agency reported Saturday.
Necat Çetin, who is also the principal of the Özbey Primary School in İzmir’s Torbalı district, has thus far identified the Romany equivalent of 4,500 Turkish words by interviewing Roma residents of the district’s Çaybaşı, Pamukyazı and Kuşçuburun neighborhoods. He is currently researching words beginning with the letter “Y.”
Aided by a team of 10 Roma people, Çetin has been working four hours a day for almost two months on the project, in addition to his job at the elementary school. He said the dictionary would include more than 5,000 words once the team’s work is completed.
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‘Big society’ chosen as Oxford University’s Word of 2010


The term “big society” has made its mark in the current year. Coined (or at any rate hammered almost to death) by the prime minister, David Cameron, and other coalition politicians, it has been chosen by Oxford academics as the Word of 2010.
The award for the word of the year, which has been relaxed in the last decade to include short phrases, was given last night after a sharp final tussle with vuvuzela and Boris bike.
“The concept of big society was a clear winner because it embraces so much of the year’s political and economic mood,” Susie Dent, of Oxford Dictionaries, said. “It has also begun to take on a life of its own, and that’s a sure sign of linguistic success.”
Tweetup, simples, staycation and jegging flew their flags for Twitter, TV advertising, British holidays and women’s leggings, but none emerged as a clear winner.
“The winner and all the words on our shortlist demonstrate the most successful processes behind language change – wordplay, blending, and the adoption of foreign terms are all there.” Susie Dent, of Oxford Dictionaries, said.
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Research reveals that some indigenous languages lack terminology to describe and understand climate change (Kenya)


Earlier this year research by the BBC World Service Trust revealed just how poorly understood the concept of climate change is in many African countries, through a project called Africa Talks Climate.
It is partly a question of cultural or religious outlook, but in many cases it is also question of vocabulary. Many indigenous languages simply do not have the equivalent words or concepts to adequately translate the scientific message of climate change.
As a result, people tend to view year-on-year warming or unpredictable rains as a localised effect rather than a global phenomenon. But the now over-familiar truth is that those nations least responsible for climate change are set to suffer most from it – and Africa and its people will need to adapt.
In this programme, Josphat Makori reports from Kenya where research has revealed just how far the urban population has to go before it truly understands the scale of the problem that is facing it. Read More...

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