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Geordie singer’s move to the United States ‘could boost translation business’


Translators are hoping Geordie Cheryl Cole’s move to the United States could create a boom in business.
Former English teacher Paul Davy has just bagged a job as a Geordie translator – after spending years deciphering the regional lingo for his Chilean wife.
His bosses think the X Factor star’s move stateside could spark a surge in interest in the north east and its history, business and speech.
This would mean more work for Paul, who was taken on after a London-based company launched a nationwide hunt for applicants. Read More...

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Welsh Assembly Government to increase spending on its translation department


The Assembly Government is planning to increase spending on its translation department at a time when the rest of the public sector is being downsized.
The move has prompted astonishment among those aware of it. One management post has already been upgraded and staff are to be invited to apply for new roles on a higher salary band.
The department is responsible for translating documents from English into Welsh.
An Assembly Government’s spokesman said: “Translation is a very important part of our business. The amount of translation has grown over the last few years, and we have responded by making the translation service larger. This has not resulted in universal upgrading or increase of salaries.”
Charlotte Linacre, campaign manager at the TaxPayers’ Alliance, said: “It will be a shock to taxpayers that pay rises are being given out now, as many are tightening their belts this Christmas and face a VAT hike in the New Year. Read More...

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Community campaigns to get rid of Welsh place name


Rockfield, near Monmouth, famous for its recording studios, was given the name Llanoronwy in 2004 by Monmouthshire Council. Villagers say the Welsh translation is unnecessary as the name has medieval origins and dates back to the Normans.
A council spokesman said there are no “immediate plans” to change signs in the village.
Roy Nicholas is the clerk of Llangattock-Vibon-Avel Community Council that is leading the campaign to get rid of the Welsh translation. He says the name Llanoronwy has no historical basis and has written to the county council asking for the Welsh translation to be removed from signs across the village. Read More...

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Common Sense Advisory’s predictions for 2011: increased visibility for language services


Each year Common Sense Advisory has issued predictions for the language services industry based on their extensive qualitative and quantitative research. In 2011, language will appear more prominently on the radar of global and domestic organizations than ever before:
* Marketers of everyday products feature built-in language support.
* Translation energizes customer experiences.
* Fiscal scars trigger spending sobriety.
* Project managers at global organizations face an identity crisis.
* Nervous tolerance of machine translation (MT) turns into enthusiastic acceptance.
* Crowdsourced and user-generated content displaces internal documentation and technical support.
* Global and multilingual social media become areas of domain expertise.
* Marketers grab the language opportunity by the “long tail.”
* Video and audio skills create localization stars.
* Hybrid “buyer/supplier” organizations make waves in the industry.
In summary, Common Sense Advisory’s predictions reveal a thriving, exciting climate for the language services industry in 2011, with an overriding theme of enhanced visibility. Language will be seen as an opportunity for revenue enablement, and the increased attention will mean that both buyer requirements and vendor offerings will evolve to become more numerous and diverse. Technology and service providers will play a vital role in facilitating this evolution. Read More...

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European Union: own single patent plan would end language feud


BRUSSELS—A plan for twelve nations from the 27-member European Union to create their own single patent would help inventors and end a stand-off over languages, the European Union’s executive arm said Tuesday.
Proposals for a single EU patent have been under discussion for over a decade, but member countries reached a stalemate over language rules. Last month, ministers for economics and enterprise failed to reach a compromise on the language, after having agreed last year on how the new system. Twelve EU member states including France, Germany, the U.K., Sweden and the Netherlands then contacted the commission asking to use the “enhanced cooperation” process to forge ahead with a patent.
Typically, unanimity is required on questions relating to multilingualism; previous negotiations stalled because Spain and Italy had wanted to see their languages included.
The latest proposal now needs to be approved by ministers on the basis of a qualified majority rather than unanimity, after the consent of the European Parliament. Next year, the commission will present detailed proposals for implementing enhanced cooperation for unitary patent protection, including translation requirements, it said.
The patent would be examined and granted in English, French or German, and inventions would be protected in all EU countries participating under the enhanced cooperation. Applicants in the EU whose language isn’t English, French or German would have the option to file applications in any other official language of the bloc. The costs for translation into one of the official languages of the European Patent Organization would be eligible for compensation.
Read More...

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