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Estonians add neologisms to the dictionary


December 2 marks the finish of a word contest initiated by the President on Re-independence day, August 20, to come up with new words that better express foreign concepts in the Estonian language
The winning neologisms will be deemed real Estonian words with full legitimacy alongside other words in the dictionary.
Organizers drew up 11 concepts for which the Estonian language currently either lacks a proper translation, has a complicated expression, borrows a foreign word, or causes confusion due to numerous definitions, reported ETV.
There were 593 participants and 2,123 word proposals. The winner of the contest is Andres Valdre, who proposed the word taristu, meaning infrastructure. Until now, the borrowed word infrastruktuur has been in wide use. Other words that were proposed include kestlik (sustainable), peavoolustamine (mainstreaming), toimeabi (humanitarian aid), tundetaip (emotional intelligence) and penipaun (doggiebag).
At the awards ceremony, 59 participants will be recognized for creative solutions that smoothly preserved the nature of the Estonian language.
The entries were evaluated by 30 judges from the Office of the President and the Institute of the Estonian Language.
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First Turkish-Romany dictionary to be completed soon


A historian in the Aegean Turkish province of İzmir has almost completed preparing the first Turkish-Romany dictionary, Doğan news agency reported Saturday.
Necat Çetin, who is also the principal of the Özbey Primary School in İzmir’s Torbalı district, has thus far identified the Romany equivalent of 4,500 Turkish words by interviewing Roma residents of the district’s Çaybaşı, Pamukyazı and Kuşçuburun neighborhoods. He is currently researching words beginning with the letter “Y.”
Aided by a team of 10 Roma people, Çetin has been working four hours a day for almost two months on the project, in addition to his job at the elementary school. He said the dictionary would include more than 5,000 words once the team’s work is completed.
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First-ever Pali-Sanskrit-Tibetan dictionary


The University of Pune has embarked on an ambitious project to bring out the first-ever trilingual Pali-Sanskrit-Tibetan dictionary. The project, being funded by University Grants Commission (UGC), has been taken up by the university department of Pali and it is being carried out in collaboration with the Tibetan University, Sarnath.
Till date, there have been only Pali-Sanskrit, Sanskrit-Tibetan and Pali-Tibetan dictionaries and experts feel one needs to have an insight into all the three languages if someone needs to do an in-depth study of Buddhism. Read More...

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New Oxford Chinese-English dictionary includes slang


Popular terms like shanzhai (fakes) and fangnu (mortgage slave) have been included in the new Oxford Chinese-English, English-Chinese dictionary that was published in China earlier this month.
Complied over the past six years by Oxford University Press and its Chinese partner Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press, the dictionary is the largest single volume of its kind and contains 670,000 words and phrases.
Shanzai, is used to describe cheap counterfeits of big-brand bags and knockoffs of electronic products. Fangnu, describes those who suffer from heavy burdens of home mortgages, especially the young in big cities. Read More...

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The word “vuvuzela” enters Oxford English Dictionary


The word “vuvuzela” has only been in common use since the summer when the long horn began to be heard at the World Cup matches in South Africa. It is one of more than 2,000 new words and phrases included in the dictionary for the first time.
Other newcomers include: tweetup (a meeting arranged through Twitter); cheeseball (lacking taste or style); and a turducken (a roast dish consisting of a chicken inside a duck inside a turkey). Two of the greatest influences on current language have been the internet and the financial crisis.
Paywall (which restricts website access only to subscribers), microblogging (posting short entries on a blog), netbook, viral and defriend have all arrived in our language because of the internet.
The financial world has also provided a host of new words including toxic debt, deleveraging (reducing debt by quickly selling assets), overleveraged, quantitative easing and staycation (a holiday spent in your home country). Many of these were words that, in the past, were only used by economists and City experts, but which have now crept into normal parlance.
The world of national and global politics has contributed a number of new words and phrases including exit strategy, the fog of war, a surge (of troops), overthinking, catatrophizing (presenting a situation as considerably worse than it actually is) and soft skills (personal attributes that let you interact harmoniously with others).
Other new entries are : wardrobe malfunction : when someone exposes an intimate part of their body after clothing slips; chill pill: a notional pill to make someone calm; bromance : a close but non-sexual relationship between two men; LBD (little black dress). This refers to the simple evening or cocktail dress that, it is claimed, should be part of every womans wardrobe; and frenemy : a person that one is friendly with despite a fundamental dislike. Read More...

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